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Antigonus
Macedonian Army General

 

Antigonus I (c. 382-30I B.C.) was one of the oldest and ablest of Alexander's Macedonian generals. He took part in the early Asiatic campaigns and in 333 was made governor of Central Phrygia. After Alexander's death Pamphylia and Lycia were added to his province. Unwilling to accept the authority of Perdiccas to whom Alexander had left his signet ring before he died, Antigonus avoided Meleager's error of risking a trial of strength and sought refuge in Macedonia. There he gained the favor of Antipater and later took the field with him against Perdiccas and his supporter the Greek Eumenes. After the death of Antipater in 319 Antigonus supported the Antipater's son Cassander against Polyperchon and concentrated his efforts first at dealing with his most dangerous local opponent Eumenes, who upheld Polyperchon's cause in Asia Minor. Having eliminated him, Antigonus tried to bring under his authority Seleucus, then Macedonian governor of Babylon. At this point his growing power and the prospect that he might reconstitute the whole of the Macedonian empire under his sole rule, alarmed Ptolemy, Seleucus, Cassander and Lysimachus sufficiently to make them combine in a coalition against him. As a part of his diplomatic warfare against them Antigonus adopted Polyperchon's tactics of offering self-government and the removal of the occupying Macedonian garrisons in the Greek cities, including those in the territories of Cassander and Lysimachus. In 306 Antigonus became the first of the Macedonian generals to take the royal title. In 304 his son Demetrius on Antigonus proclaimed the Greeks free from Macedonia with an aim to harness the Greeks in affiance which preserved the forms of their independence. But at the Battle of Ipsus in 301, the combined armies of Seleucus and Lysimachus defeated Antigonus. With his death perished the idea of uniting the Macedonian empire under a single ruler.

 

 

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